Archives for posts with tag: Photography

Nestled in the Cotswold countryside lies the 600-acre arboretum of Westonbirt. The vast collection of Victorian trees offers a kaleidoscope of autumnal colour, from the vibrant reds of the Japanese maple to the burnt umbers of the walnut trees.

The forest has two seasonal trials– The Old Arboretum leads you through expansive vistas and canopied hide-aways amongst trees from all over the world. And the other, Silk Wood, offers a longer, dog-friendly walk where the stunning Japanese maple trail can be found.

Winding paths through the vast, dense forest captivate you into hours of exploration. Towering trees shelter the Eden-like woodland, where shafts of light dapple through the branches and its leaves flutter down, carpeting the ground in a scattering of colour. The soft autumn sun warms the hues of the forest tinting the foliages gold, whilst misted dewy grass lingers in its shadows.

Once you tire from all the walking, head to the nearby market town of Tetbury. With over 1,300 years of history, the historic town boasts a rich heritage. Meander through the cluster of antique shops or warm up with some tea at Cafe Edge. Be sure to check out the 16-century Market House in the centre which holds markets twice a month.

    

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Sunday; a wonderful weekend, we even managed to escape the City for a few hours. Refreshing our lungs with West countryside air, we stopped at Barrow Wake viewpoint on the way to Worcester. It overlooks Gloucestershire and it’s name derives from the Iron Age burial that was discovered here in 1879.

Clearly very attached to my vintage duster, I wear it with my new Nike Flash Pagasus running shoes, which are so comfortable for everyday wear, I am reluctant to exhaust them with punishing running miles.

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Moving out, especially to a big city such as London, can feel like a daunting prospect. But in this cosy suburb of North London, Muswell Hill is kind to the amateur Londoner, with its orderly middle class atmosphere and village feel Broadway.
Notoriously one of the most sought after areas in London, my budget and I fought over a cosy room (and by cosy I mean small) in a large house share.
After a week of finding my feet, I am beginning to settle in by marking my territory, that is the kitchen cupboard, and by adding personal touches to my room, regardless of whether it’s starting to resemble a jumble sale.
I am gradually learning to master the art of multi-purposing furniture and obscuring ‘stuff’; my current masterpiece being the wardrobe. Under it, on top of it, behind it, on the doors- each piece has been suitably placed. I have even contemplated making use of the walls, their bareness could most definitely be utilised.
Getting up at winters dawn results in loud bangs and bruises and my morning yoga could pass as a form of robotic dance, but I suppose the cooped up chicken feeling will surpass and minimalism will feel too cold and empty.
And if it doesn’t, then the mass of greenery in Alexandra Park will do the trick. It is a runners paradise, with bouncy joggers sprouting from beyond the leafy trees and effortlessly gallivanting their way up the menacing hills, as I huff and puff my way to the top. But the reward does not disappoint. Panoramic views of London stare back and the air is surprisingly cleaner than the thick smog that projects over the rest of the London’s skyline.
The grand Alexandra Palace and I overlook the parkland and cityscape beyond, as I play tourist in my new local area. In the last of autumnal sunshine, I subtly bask in its rays as I make my way downhill towards the Sunday famers market. A long stretch of food stalls and a gathering of Muswell Hillians casually lunching on handmade pies and cold pressed juices, makes for quite the social event. With so many choices for all food palates, my sweet tooth caved in and I purchased a slice of the dark chocolate banana loaf from Nyborg’s Kitchen. This moistly dense, sweetly spiced slice of gluten-free heaven went down perfectly with my vanilla chai tea!

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Harmonious with macaroon coloured walls of Portmierion, this pastel co-ord I made was the perfect outfit for a mannerly meander through the romantic village.

Simple, soft and clean cut- I tailored a fit and flare skirt with a box flared crop using a light scuba fabric.

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Our mission was to climb Mount Snowdon; to increase our pulse, to tire our muscles and then revel in the satisfaction of conquering the highest peak in Wales. But our first mission was finding mighty mountain.
An area of narrow, tall hedged winding roads is a hazardous feature for the urban tourist. Accustomed to concrete forests, the abundance of greenery becomes indistinguishable, as do the unpronounceable signposts to the English monolinguist.
The mountainous backdrop soon began to arise from the exhausting labyrinth and compass us towards its direction.
Like sitting front row in the cinema, the mountainous scenery was on full screen, we were at Snowdon’s base. And as it turned out, so was everyone else…
With the car parks full, we decided to do the driving tour of Snowdon. Hilly roads provided an exhilarating roller coaster ride, with stunning views of the surrounding landscape.
So I guess this is a lazy guide to Snowdon, but it gives me all the more reason to return!

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Staycations have prevailed this year, and although I am an advocate for UK adventuring, I can’t help but pine for sun kissed, Mediterranean meanders through a pretty white washed village.
Portmeirion did not disappoint. My lust fulfilled, we left behind the rural backdrop of Wales for an hour or two and became captivated into an Italian-esque, fantasy village.

Influenced by the Baroque movement, designer Sir Clough Williams-Ellis has manipulated this artificial village with sublime opulence.
It is beautifully constructed upon the landscape, with dramatic architecture accentuating the hillside that gazes down onto the River Dwyryd estuary.

Portmeirion succeeds at seducing you into this pursuit of perfectionism of macaroon coloured buildings embellished with romantic Renaissance art, stucco sculpturing and peeping arches that overlook the river.
You become part of the idealism, playing a role as you stroll along the cobble stoned paths, pretending you are Lucy Honeychurch in ‘A Room With a View’.

So, after a pleasant wander through the gardens, a ponder in the fountain square and an alfresco dine outside the gelato shop we were ready to head back to reality.

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Historic town Caernarfon boasts a grandiose status with its medieval castle overlooking the river Sieont. Whilst it’s town reveals a quaintness, intrinsically built around the relic walls and with it’s intimate streets that lead you to the harbour.

An array of pastel washed townhouses and brightly hued shops mellow the stern grey walls of the fortress.
It’s photo snapping tourists (including myself) and friendly cafe culture, leave no hint of the austere and intimidating medieval town that once stood.

After a curious cycle around the area, the lure of the colourful gelato shop enticed us in. And so we stood, in the shadows of Caernarfon Castle happily licking away our gelato’s!
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